New Resources

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A couple of key organizations have recently started some wonderful blogs. Expand your personal learning network with these great resources.

Change.org started a blog in January. They hit on a range of topics including an interview with Thomas Friedman, Charter Schools, Writing, Class Size, Teacher Unions.... No educational topic appears off limits. Click here to check it out! 

HOPE Foundation, an organization dedicated to "supporting educational leaders over time in creating school cultures where failure is not an option for any student," debuted their What's Working in Schools Blog in February. Topics include professional development, teacher issues, policy, assessment and much more. Click here to view the What's Working in schools Blog.  

National Staff Development Council (NSDC), who's purpose is to ensure "every educator engages in effective professional learning every day so every student achieves." NSDC began a blog in January entitled Reflections. Authors include Stephanie Hirsh, Hayes Mizell, Jim Knight, Joellen Killian and more. The blog is dedicated to effective professional development. Click here to obtain great thinking on effective staff development.

 Psychology Today offers a menu of excellent blogs. My favorite is Radical Teaching, Classroom Strategies from a Neurologist by Dr. Judy Willis,  a board-certified neurologist and middle school teacher. She is an authority on classroom strategies derived from brain research. Click here for bio. She is an amazing resource. Click here to check out her blog.

Teaser: we have Dr. Willis coming to the IU in October to talk about math and the brain!

Comments

kemeigh said…
I just checked out Judy Willis' interview on the ASCD website, http://www.ascd.org/Publications/Books/ASCD_Talks_With_an_Author/ASCD_Talks_With_an_Author_(main).aspx
It was very motivating and very applicable for all educators. Take a listen and see what you think! Thanks Kelly for the resource sharing!

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